West Virginia Covered Bridges

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BARRACKVILLE COVERED BRIDGE\nLemuel Chenoweth, a covered bridge builder and contractor from Beverly, built The Barrackville covered bridge in 1853.  It is a multiple Kingport truss with a Burr arch, 148 feet in length and 20 feet wide.  It was completely restored in 1999.\n  It is located on Marion County Route 21 in Barrackville, West Virginia. CARROLLTON COVERED BRIDGE\n  The second longest and third oldest covered bridge in West Virginia, this span was built in 1856, by contractors Daniel and Emmett J. O’Brien of Beverly.  About 140 feet in length and 16 feet in width, this bridge is one of three examples in the state of the patented Burr Arch truss structure.  The bridge was upgraded in the early 1960’s but the covering and the sides of the old bridge were left intact.  It is schedule to be completely restored in 2003.\n  To locate it, from the junction of US routes 119 and 250 in Philippi, take route 119 south 6 miles to secondary route 36 (Carrollton Road).  Turn left and drive 7/10 mile directly to the bridge over the Buckhannon River. CENTER POINT COVERED BRIDGE\n  The only covered bridge in Doddridge County the Center Point Bridge was built sometime between 1888-90.  T.W. Ancell and E. Underwood built abutments with John Ash and S.H. Smith building the superstructure.  It is located on private land over Talkington Fork of McElroy Creek, and is 42.1 feet in length and 12.6 feet wide.  Citizens of Center Point  restored it in the early 1980’s, and it was completely restored once again in 2004.\n  To locate it, from US route 50 west of Salem, WV take secondary route 23.  Drive 10.2 mile to Pike Fork Road 10.  Turn right and the bridge will be within sight. DENTS RUN COVERED BRIDGE\n  Built sometime after 1889 Dents Run is the only covered bridge remaining in Monongalia County.  W.Y. Loar built the abutments and William and Joseph Mercer built the superstructure.  It is 40 feet in length and 12 feet wide.\n  To locate the bridge from interstate 79, take Westover exit 152.  Turn south on US route 19 and drive 3.2 miles to Sugar Grove Road.  Turn right and drive 7/10 mile watching carefully on the left for a gravel road.  Take a left turn and drive 1/10 mile directly to the bridge. FISH CREEK COVERED BRIDGE\n  Accurate history of the construction of Fish Creek Bridge is unknown, but it is thought to have been built about 1880-81 by relatives of C.W. Critchfield.  The bridge is 36 feet long and 13 feet wide.  It was completely restored in 2000.\n  Fish Creek covered Bridge is located at the junction of US route 250 and secondary road 13 near Hundred in Wetzel County West Virginia. FLETCHER OR TEN MILE CREEK COVERED BRIDGE\n  Built in 1891, L.E. Sturm built the abutments and Soloman Swiger built the Kingpost truss superstructure.  It is 58 feet in length and 12 feet wide.  It was completely restored in 2002.\n  To locate this bridge travel US route 50 west of Clarksburg, WV and take Marshville exit 5.  Drive 1.6 mile to this bridge located over the right-hand fork of Ten Mile Creek. HERNS MILLS OR MILLIGAN CREEK COVERED BRIDGE\n  Unfortunately the names of the builders have been lost, but it is believed this bridge was built sometime between 1879 and 1884.  It was built using a variation of the Queenpost truss design and is 54 feet in length and 10.5 feet wide.  At one time this bridge provided access to the S.S. Hern Mill.  It was completely restore in 2000.\n  To locate this bridge from the junction of US routes 219 and 60 in downtown Lewisburg, WV take US route 60 west 3.5 miles to Bungers Mill Road 60/11.  Turn left and drive 2/10 mile to Herns Mill Road 40 and turn left again.  Drive 1 mile directly to Herns Mill Bridge over Milligan Creek. HOKES MILL OR SECOND CREEK COVERED BRIDGE\n  The completion of this bridge is estimated to have been between 1897 and 1899.  B.F. Mann, R.A. McDowell and Austin B. Erwin were appointed by the county commission to have the bridge constructed for $700.  Utilizing a modified Long truss, the bridge is more than 81 feet long and 12 feet wide.  It was completely restored in 2002.\n  To locate this bridge from the junction of US routes 219 and 60 in downtown Lewisburg, WV, take US 219 south 4.9 miles to River Road county route 48.  This road is located on the south end of the Greenbrier River Bridge in Ronceverte, WV.  Turn right and drive 5.0 miles directly to the bridge located over Second Creek on your left. INDIAN CREEK COVERED BRIDGE\n  Oscar and Ray Weikel, then only 16 and 18 years old built this bridge near Union in 1898 – 1899.  Utilizing a modified Howe truss, the bridge is about 49 feet in length and 12 feet wide and cost about $400.  Although the bridge was abandoned in the late 1920’s or early 1930’s, the Monroe county Historical Society leased it in 1965.  A brother of the original builders was hired to strengthen it.  It was completely restored in 2000.\n  To locate this bridge start on US route 219 in Union, WV and drive south on US 219 about 5 miles directly to the bridge on the west side. LILY DALE OR LAUREL CREEK COVERED BRIDGE\n  This bridge was built in about 1911.  Lewis Miller constructed the stone abutments and Charles Robert Arnott built the superstructure.  At 25 feet in length and 13 feet wide it is the smallest covered bridge in the state.  It was completely restored in the late 1990’s.\n  To locate the bridge start on US route 219 in Union, WV and drive south on US 219 3.2 miles to Lily Dale Road 219/7 at Salt Sulphur Springs.  Turn right and drive down Lily Dale road for 3 miles where the road forks.  Take the right fork, Laurel Creek Road 219/11, and continue for 1.4 miles directly to the bridge over Laurel Creek. LOCUST CREEK COVERED BRIDGE\n  Built in 1888 by R.N. Bruce this bridge is 113 feet in length and was built in accordance with the double Warren truss system, near the Josiah Beard Mill.  Records indicate that a bridge was located on this site as early as 1822, but it is not known if it was covered.  Locust Creek Bridge was completely restored in 2002.\n  To locate this bridge from Hillsboro, WV drive south on US 219 to Locust Creek Road 20.  Turn left and drive 3.3 miles to a stop sign, turn right and the bridge is located approximately 150 feet ahead. MILTON OR MUD RIVER COVERED BRIDGE\n  Originally located on East Mud River Road this bridge was moved to the Cabell County Fair Grounds in 1997.  It was built in 1875-76, and is sometimes confused with a separate earlier covered bridge built nearby in 1834 and replaced in 1955.  Supported by a modified Howe truss it is 208.5 feet in length and 14 feet wide.  It was totally restored in 2001.\n  From interstate 64 East of Huntington, WV take exit 28 (Milton) and turn toward Milton, drive 3/10 mile to US route 60.  Turn right onto US route 60 West and drive 4/10 mile to 1st stoplight.  Turn left onto Fair Ground Road and drive 7/10 mile to One Pumpkin Way.  Milton Bridge is located on your left. PHILIPPI COVERED BRIDGE\n  Also known as the Lemuel Chenoweth Bridge after it’s builder, Philippi Bridge was constructed at a cost of about $12,180 in 1852.  Lemuel and Eli Chenoweth of Beverly built the superstructure and Emmett J. O’Brien was the masonry contractor.  It nearly burned to the ground in February 1989, and was completely restored and opened to traffic in the summer of 1991.   \n  The span was built to facilitate use of the Beverly and Fairmont Road, which had been built in turn to stimulate use of the Staunton-Parkersburg Turnpike.\n  One of six two-lane covered bridges remaining in the United States; it is the only one that still serves federal highway traffic – US route 250.\n  It is believed to have escaped destruction during the Civil War because Union troops secured it early in the war.  Used by both Northern and Southern troops, it is sometimes recognized as the site of the first land battle of the Civil War.\n  This bridge is located at the junction of US routes 119 and 250 in Philippi, WV. SARVIS FORK OR SANDY CREEK COVERED BRIDGE\n  Spanning the river that bears it’s name, Sandy Creek, this bridge is more than 101 feet in length and 11 feet wide.  George W. Staats originally built it in 1889 over the John Carnahan Fork using a modified Long system for $64.  In 1924 it was replaced by an iron bridge, dismantled and rebuilt over the Left Fork of Big Sandy Creek, by C.R. Kent, R.R. Hardesty and E.R. Duke.\n  To locate this bridge from downtown Ripley, WV start at the junction of US route 33 and secondary route 21.  Drive route 21 north for 10.9 miles to Sarvis Fork Road 21/15.  Turn right and drive 2/10 mile directly to the bridge.  It was completely restored in 2000. SIMPSON CREEK OR HOLLENS MILL COVERED BRIDGE\n  Built in 1881 by Asa Hugill this bridge is a multiple Kingpost truss design and is 75 foot in length and 14 feet wide.  In 1889 it was washed away by a flood and rebuilt in it’s current location one half mile downstream.  It was completely restored in 2002.\n  To locate this bridge take the Meadowbrook road exit 121 from interstate 79 at Bridgeport, WV.  Turn toward Meadowbrook Mall on secondary route 24 and drive approximately 4/10 mile directly to the bridge on the left. STAATS MILL COVERED BRIDGE\n  Built in 1887 by H.T. Hartley, this bridge spanned the Tug Fork of Big Mill Creek at Staats Mill, about 9 miles southeast of Ripley.\n  Hartley used the patented Long truss system to construct the 97-foot long and 11-foot wide span.  The bridge was originally built in the area settled by Abraham and Ann King Staats, whose grandson Issac built Staats Mill.\n  The bridge was moved in 1983 to its present location at Cedar Lakes state FFA-FHA camp near Ripley.  It now serves as a walking bridge and its maintenance is the responsibility of the Cedar Lake Conference Center.\n  To locate the bridge, from downtown Ripley at the junction of US route 33 and secondary route 21, take route 21 south for 9/10 mile to a small sign on the right, which says “Cedar Lakes Road”.  Turn left and drive 1.7 miles to Cedar Lakes, the bridge sits over a pond inside the camp. WALKERSVILLE COVERED BRIDGE\n  About 39 feet long and 12 feet wide and Queenpost truss design, this bridge was built across the right fork of West Fork River in 1903 by John G. Sprigg.  It is to be completely restored in 2003.\n  To locate this bridge take Roanoke exit 91 from interstate 79 south of Weston, WV.  Drive south on US route 19 for 13 miles to Big Run Road 19/17 just south of Walkersville.  Turn right and the bridge will be within sight.